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3 Atm What Does That Really Mean Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   cody 

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 01:14 PM

why does it say the watch is 3 atm or 98ft water res., but then in the manual it states you can not even take a shower or bath(unless watch hand is out of water-lol) with it? That is not 3 atm---that is more like .05atm. Can someone explain these please? This is my first oris and i love it. But i have to remove it for hot tubs(inless hand is out), showers, dishes(says i can do that), swimming and so on(i just repeated myself). If i would have known that i would have got one with a higher atm, but i love the skeleton look!!

ANY ONE ELSE FIND THIS STRANGE?

ps or can i swim and etc with it? Them just covering ther butt?

thanks

cody
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#2 User is offline   JRMH 

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 02:08 PM

hi Cody, welcome to the forum :blush:

See Here http://www.friendsof...showtopic=28374

that should pretty well answer your questions. :cool:
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#3 User is offline   cody 

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 04:30 PM

Thanks for the great info there. Thanks for the welcome. But that one guy did have a good point. The engineer who did the numbers. Swim speed, depth and so on........ Still did not add up to the 50 meter testing. but i got it. Take of the watch off. I have come to the conclusion that the rating is only good if i am on a boat and the watch falls off and floats slowly to the bottom(if less then 3 atm for my watch). With the water temp being not to hot or cold. I would then be fine. ONe last question then i will leave this dead horse alone. this is only for arguement sake. Don't your hand get more wet washing them( people wash in warmer water to) then in a shower or equal?? I did not see a time limited listed in the instruction. So why one is ok and one is not? Rain i would assume is ok or is that like the shower.lol!!!

LOve the watch---skeleton
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#4 User is offline   JRMH 

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 05:52 PM

View Postcody, on Sep 13 2009, 08:30 PM, said:

ONe last question then i will leave this dead horse alone. this is only for arguement sake. Don't your hand get more wet washing them( people wash in warmer water to) then in a shower or equal?? I did not see a time limited listed in the instruction. So why one is ok and one is not? Rain i would assume is ok or is that like the shower.lol!!!

LOve the watch---skeleton


No problem. For hand washing vs shower, I would consider them quite different. At least for me, my watch rarely even gets wet when I wash my hands. I occasionally get soap on the bracelet but the watch itself is pretty out of the way. If it does get wet it is normally a few drops which is unlikely to damage any watch no matter the depth rating. So in my case anyways a watch will get exposed to a lot more water at a higher pressure while in the shower.

Rain will be fine, I have a BCC with a 50M rating and have never had a problem even in a heavy down pour. I would also consider rain to be different from a shower. For rain I don't imagine your arms will be above your head (...unless you like dancing in the rain? lol) they will probably be at your side. that means your watch is much less likely to get hit directly with a lot of force so there is nothing to worry about especially if you have long sleeves on.

btw the company that does the best job with pretty accurate WR is IWC, see here
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#5 User is offline   cody 

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 06:01 PM

I found this on wikipedia-this is for(not oris) all watches with atm or water ratings. Not sure where they get(wikipedia gets there info), but my daughter likes them(she's 11) and told me to look--so i did. But thought it made a little more since what they have posted. I guess it is still bugging me, but i will get over what they(oris) has for it water limits and numbers. Just wanted to post this and get any thoughts?



The watches are tested in theoretical depths, thus a watch with a 50 meter rating will be water resistant if it is stationary and under 50 meters of still water for a set amount of time. The most commonly used method for testing the water resistance is by depressurizing a small chamber containing the watch. A sensor measures the movement of the case and crystal to gauge how much pressure the watch is losing and how fast. The watch never touches water in this type of machine. Another type of machine is used for very deep measure tests, where the watch is immersed in a small container filled with water, this chamber is then submitted to the pressure the watch is supposed to withstand. In neither case is there any variation in the pressure, or is the watch submitted to that pressure for an extended period of time(normally only a couple of minutes). These are the only logical ways to test the water resistance of a watch, since adding variations added by time spent underwater or the movement of the wearers hands would simply make this a very intricate and difficult measurement. Although confusing this is the best way of telling the customer what to expect. For normal use, the ratings must therefore be translated from the pressure the watch can withstand to take into account the extra pressure generated by motion and time spent underwater.

Watches are classified by their degree of water resistance, which roughly translates to the following (1 meter = 3.281 feet):[18]

Water resistance rating Suitability Remarks
Water Resistant 30 m or 50 m Suitable for water related work and fishing. suitable for swimming or diving.
Water Resistant 100 m Suitable for recreational surfing, swimming, snorkeling, sailing and water sports. suitable for diving.
Water Resistant 200 m Suitable for professional marine activity and serious surface water sports. suitable for diving.
Diver's 100 m Minimum ISO standard (ISO 6425) for scuba diving at depths NOT requiring helium gas. Diver's 100 m and 150 m watches are generally old(er) watches.
Diver's 200 m or 300 m Suitable for scuba diving at depths NOT requiring helium gas. Typical ratings for contemporary diver's watches.
Diver's 300+ m helium safe Suitable for saturation diving (helium enriched environment). Watches designed for helium mixed-gas diving will have additional markings to point this out.

Some watches use bar instead of meters, which may then be multiplied by 10 to be approximately equal to the rating based on meters. Therefore, a 10 bar watch is equivalent to a 100 meter watch. Some watches are rated in atmospheres (atm), which are roughly equivalent to bar.


the site is http://en.wikipedia....nical_movements if you wish to read all.

ps like the guy,jrmh, said above me iwc has pretty much the same thing stated here. good info






thanks cody
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#6 User is offline   rob ayala 

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:05 PM

Cody what you have is an Industry "consensus".

Trust me..that is an achievement in itself :)

The problem is why on earth would you have a 30m or rating on a watch and can't take it swimming. It has always been a problem.

Personally I wouldn't change much except the 30m rating to NWI (on the back of the case). It equates to "No water immersion"

#7 User is offline   JRMH 

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 02:32 PM

View Postcody, on Sep 14 2009, 10:01 PM, said:

I found this on wikipedia-this is for(not oris) all watches with atm or water ratings. Not sure where they get(wikipedia gets there info), but my daughter likes them(she's 11) and told me to look--so i did. But thought it made a little more since what they have posted. I guess it is still bugging me, but i will get over what they(oris) has for it water limits and numbers. Just wanted to post this and get any thoughts?

Water resistance rating Suitability Remarks
Water Resistant 30 m or 50 m Suitable for water related work and fishing. suitable for swimming or diving.
Water Resistant 100 m Suitable for recreational surfing, swimming, snorkeling, sailing and water sports. suitable for diving.
Water Resistant 200 m Suitable for professional marine activity and serious surface water sports. suitable for diving.
Diver's 100 m Minimum ISO standard (ISO 6425) for scuba diving at depths NOT requiring helium gas. Diver's 100 m and 150 m watches are generally old(er) watches.
Diver's 200 m or 300 m Suitable for scuba diving at depths NOT requiring helium gas. Typical ratings for contemporary diver's watches.
Diver's 300+ m helium safe Suitable for saturation diving (helium enriched environment). Watches designed for helium mixed-gas diving will have additional markings to point this out.

ps like the guy,jrmh, said above me iwc has pretty much the same thing stated here. good info

thanks cody


This list has it's problems IMO, Oris is pretty much with the rest of the industry on their WR ratings and this list isn't really with Oris. IWC is really the one that is more on their own with their standards. Do I wish the whole industry was with IWC? yes, because their system just makes more sense but unfortunately that's not the case. The problem with general lists like this is that they are general and this one doesn't even lean towards being cautious (which I would suggest because who wants to screw up their $1000+ watch?). Most watch companies say 30m or 50m is really not mean't for any water at all (aka washing hands is about all you should do). Sure it's possible you could take your 30m or 50m WR watch in the water for a swim and never have a problem but IMO it's a pretty big risk when the manufacturer has a suggestion not to do that. In general 100m is suitable for surface swimming, not diving. Again in general over 100m is ok for diving.

Just as a general rule I would suggest everyone always check their manual for WR information. That way you won't accidentally get the wrong information which could be an expensive mistake.
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#8 User is offline   Berg35 

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 02:06 AM

View PostJRMH, on Sep 16 2009, 12:32 AM, said:

This list has it's problems IMO, Oris is pretty much with the rest of the industry on their WR ratings and this list isn't really with Oris. IWC is really the one that is more on their own with their standards. Do I wish the whole industry was with IWC? yes, because their system just makes more sense but unfortunately that's not the case. The problem with general lists like this is that they are general and this one doesn't even lean towards being cautious (which I would suggest because who wants to screw up their $1000+ watch?). Most watch companies say 30m or 50m is really not mean't for any water at all (aka washing hands is about all you should do). Sure it's possible you could take your 30m or 50m WR watch in the water for a swim and never have a problem but IMO it's a pretty big risk when the manufacturer has a suggestion not to do that. In general 100m is suitable for surface swimming, not diving. Again in general over 100m is ok for diving.

Just as a general rule I would suggest everyone always check their manual for WR information. That way you won't accidentally get the wrong information which could be an expensive mistake.

Can you explain the IWC standard or where can I read about it?
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#9 User is offline   JRMH 

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Posted 16 September 2009 - 05:12 AM

View PostBerg35, on Sep 16 2009, 06:06 AM, said:

Can you explain the IWC standard or where can I read about it?


It's in one of the posts above but here is it again IWC WR Chart
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